Empirical Evidence at Odds with Fallacious gTLD Assumptions and Talking Points!

Morning Folks!!

Coming to the right conclusions with less information and doing it early. Isn't that what speculation is about?  Figuring it out early or first? I figured this out in 1996-1997 after starting in 1995 and each day I figure out a little more and I will never apologize for being first on a line. Or first to see something. Or first to take action. Or first to register a domain name. And anyone that would point to that as anything negative could only define themselves, not me.

Like I said, Berkens is my research department because he finds things FIRST. Newspapers are in business to be first. They want to break the story first.

In what I do, I want to find all the pitfalls first. It's the pitfalls that need attention and that is what I focus on. I tune out the blue sky talk totally as that is a trap for the naive. You only see the blue sky if you survive the tornado and storms they swear are not there.

The beginning, the end and the pitfalls along the trail. What else really matters? I don't care about the BS drama and lipstick along the way.

A pitfall can never be ignored. So they have to be addressed. But a pitfall can only be filled with an argument that is sound and holds water.

I have been making posts on ".whatever" for 2.5 years now. Dozens of posts with .whatever in the title and some 90 posts examining it from top to bottom. I thought about it for a long time before I ever wrote a single word and my main job sitting here is thinking and playing out different scenarios looking for answers.  Real answers. Not based on what I want, but based on the reality of what I see and the future as I see it unfolding. On the record for the record before it becomes commonplace.

And when I was doing that on Sunday I found......

Another argument that makes no sense.

On one side I am told by gtld companies that 5-6 billion people are yet to go online. And this huge expansion coming. ok, fine. Let's say I buy into that for the MOMENT since the buying power for about 3 billion of them is zilch. But leave that aside, their argument is for those 6 billion. So I will follow their yellow brick road.

Then a few  minutes later they say how they are going to leave .com as the market share gets all diluted and watered down. How does that make any sense when they just got through telling me about those 6 billion being added?? Which yellow brick road do they want me to walk down. Which one am I to believe? Because these 2 premises collide.  They very simply collide. They can't have it both ways.  So when you stick to the numbers, there is no room for bullshit like this.

I am in sales. These are arguments that don't hold water and they contradict themselves. Am I supposed to swallow this?

The facts of the matter are already there with other parallels for those that choose to look at them and understand them. Folks want to look at Las Vegas and their growth without looking at other places and their growth. But again, there was a REASON to go to Vegas. There was a need, there was a want and there was a desire for gambling and entertainment and hot chicks and booze. They were the only place you could go for legalized gaming in those days.

Now look. You have all types of states and countries doing the gaming and lottery and yes Las Vegas has collapsed right?????? Is that what horse shit I am supposed to swallow guys??

Macau, lotteries, indian casinos, islands, Reno, Lake Tahoe, Cruise Ships. Are you kidding me. HOW did that hurt Las Vegas?? It didn't and it made it even greater than it was. So your argument is not consistent with empirical evidence aka FACTS!

A rising tide lifts all boats. Thinking .com will go down in value or have less traffic is absolutely the nuttiest thing I have EVER heard. It goes against empirical evidence I just pointed to. Give that one up!

Ok?

I make points with evidence. And why would anyone even argue these points? It may work for folks that know nothing about domain names when you are raising funds, but this is nonsense inside the walls of this industry by folks that really should understand this all much better. They are coming to assumptions that are not backed up by examples of history. Like I keep on repeating now. Empirical Evidence. Las Vegas just the latest in a series proving the fallacy of this silly argument.

And we don't have to wait 20 years to see the winner. It will be evident each week on Ron Jackson's report. More Empirical Evidence. Not wishful thinking or a fallacious hypothesis. But past facts. The test holds true over and over and over again.

And just remember, most of the biggest deals are still not disclosed. Escrow.com started about 66% if my memory serves me correctly. And the bigger they are, the less chance they are disclosed. And even in a disclosure can be hidden as far as exact amount paid when you buy a company for their domain name.

Folks are free and welcome to speculate on anything they choose. Some will make money. Most will lose money. But selling on false assumptions and false arguments that are squarely against history is weak and I think does not help the position of those that use it. Hundreds of different sales strategies that are going to cause their own set of collisions.

Some are going to struggle desperately to stay above water.  Some are going to sink right to the very bottom. These are absolute givens. They are facts just awaiting time to confirm them. But in speculation you have to determine those facts BEFORE they are facts. But to do that, you must have the facts to begin with and the history to back it up. So when I am presented a false set of facts, based on false history, on the heels of .Mobi, .biz, .pro, .xxx, well then I have a RIGHT to raise these objections and questions and be on record and so do you.

I don't have to sell a thing, they do. But please raise the level of the conversation to match the reality at hand and the audience you are addressing. I would certainly be much more receptive to that level then some of the nonsense I am hearing. I do not wish for the failure of any extension. Quite the opposite. I root for their success. Their success is not a threat it is fuel. I am stunned that otherwise intelligent folks would see it like the glass is half full. The greatest success would have .com and many other extensions overflowing.

Look at my writings and you will see it is consistent with the rise in popularity of .tv. I think .tv will benefit from this. I don't see a single extension suffering. I see only expansion regardless of population. 7 billion people is not how you measure. You measure by companies and how many each of them will control. Companies at one time had one website. Now they have dozens or hundreds or thousands. THAT is the population I focus on. Those are the folks that can and will expand the most and the quickest. Many of them with decent budgets.

Why would anyone think that selling a win-lose concept comes out as a winning hand?? The world is about win-win. That is the way to get people's attention. Win-win. Show them a way to expand their online presence. Show them only positives. Anything built on negatives or false assumptions or fallacious information will eventually collapse.

And collapsing is different from failing because this is all 99.9% forseeable.

1234567890123 without any .com rings every phone in the world. there are a total of 9,999,999,999,999.

9.9 TRILLION combinations with those 13 digits. Maybe a few less actually. But in theory......

Now last time I looked you can go many times n=more than 13 digits before you add the .com. You can go to 63 I think it is. That pus a hole in their argument before I even start my argument and I can prove my argument with NUMBERS not EMOTION 63 different ways. I can have more combinations with the same 13 digits that ring every phone in the world. All I need to do is substitute one letter for a number. I can use just the letter "A" until with all the variables. Then "B" the "C". Then after I got to z I could start to use 2 letter variables. Then 3. Then all words that use up to 13 letters. Then I have not even mentioned dashes. Nor have I dsaid anything about 14 digit domain.

Smell the BULLSHIT?? There must be a math major here somewhere that can highlight what infinity might look like. I will admit, .com is NOT infinite. Tho for the purposes we use it for, it is. So please don't expect anyone with an ounce of sense to swallow bullshit. I just proved it and I barely scratched the surface. I could sit here every day for the next 20 years and I would not run out if examples when I hear we are running out of .com. Not sure if there is even a name for a number the size of what we are talking about.

Point is this is 100% fallacious. Pure and simple. What happens when I do it on a low-level like this, is the antenna goes up and you look for other fallacious arguments and you start to see a picture being developed. I am truly trying to save these folks from a Kodak moment when they go on the world stage. I think these things are poisoning the waters a bit and it is self-inflicted poison. Needless! They have stronger arguments. I hope!

Success for a gtld does not translate to anything bad for any of us. Between this post and yesterdays post, I just try to have a balanced approach and at the same time not listen to silly stuff and my job is to spotlight silly stuff so we can focus on the real subjects. Which are the extensions themselves, the adaptation by the MASSES, the reasons why without making the weak case that has been made.

.com is a phenomenon. The graph that Verisign released is another example of how hard this is going to be. STUDY that chart!! Look at the SLIVER they are all going to fight over. Wake me up when any of them get out of the "Other" category. Any of them. Registry success has nothing to do with our success.  The one that has the best chance is .web and it is no secret.

And as far as my 20 year plan and those trying to use that to cover them now. This is what I wrote as a comment on TheArtofTheName.com yesterday:

"To be honest. I could not put a 20 year plan together today given the circumstances today. The 20 year plan was for a unique moment in time. With a specific medium. That had specific parallels. And I put a time stamp until we hit critical mass. And it worked!!

I never had one before and I doubt I will ever have one again. People have to eat today with a vision of the future. But in this fast paced medium, 20 years is CRAZY! I focus on now and the 36 months in front of us as a rule and year to year as a basis for progress.

The Internet was a unique circumstance because it was the largest endeavor in the history of the world and I realized that and what the changes would look like in 2013.

But this is worse that Kool-Aid because it is laced with BS and many ignore the basic questions that are asked.

At the end of the day it will be content and consumer acceptance that decides. Not any of us. All we can do is bet on the eventual outcome."

You can see the video from T.R.A.F.F.I.C. There is no anger in the argument, there is just a disagreement among friends about where the road goes and I think their compass is not calibrated correctly. :-) The future will sort it out. They took out their wallets and are taking a risk. Bravo! The question is risk based on what? A question we get to ask when it comes to our wallets. Especially since it is hard if not impossible to point out past successes with similar products with less competition.

Rick Schwartz



34 thoughts on “Empirical Evidence at Odds with Fallacious gTLD Assumptions and Talking Points!

  1. Pitbull

    Las Vegas is indeed a great example… I think it does provide a two-fold example. Las Vegas has no suffered one ounce of loss with all these new casino’s, if anything they opened up more eyes and more people are now curious what’s so great about Las Vegas. The greatest thing here is that is also shows that there is plenty of room at the table for some other casino’s(tld’s). I live near two of the largest Indian Casino’s in North America, neither of them will ever knock Vegas off the map or even compete with it. But, there is room for these casino’s, that is, they have their place in the ecosystem. So, your point is really a great capture of both aspects…. .com will not be dethroned or face any real competition, in fact it will likely grow with the new blood. But for those entering the new tld race, there is room at the table for you just leave room for the king(.com)…

    Reply
    1. Rick Schwartz

      Not a real word.
      Has very limited value.
      But anything can be branded with the right idea and content. Music “S” for “Supply” or “Savings” etc.
      But for $76k……no way a domainer should buy imo. It’s pigeon shit as far as investing at $76k. And it would be an uphill battle for an end user. With a $76k budget, they can do better.

      Reply
  2. Jim Holleran

    Rick, I been investing in .tv since 2000, had some great sales, with Michael Berkins brokering many of them. I believe in it more than ever, but just want to know why you think .tv is going to keep thriving?

    Reply
  3. Jeff Schneider

    Hello Rick,

    For close to twenty years now, The Dark .COM Shadow Market has successfully decieved and manipulated .COM valuations.

    R. E. = ” And just remember, most of the biggest deals are still not disclosed. ”

    This below the radar attempt to manipulate and control pricing is proof that the Smart money collectors operate in their own exclusive buying Lair. The Chinese collectors in this realm could care less about English spelled Generic gTLD markers. They are agressively purchasing .COM Franchise addresses.

    Gratefully, Jeff Schneider (Contact Group) (Metal Tiger)

    Reply
  4. Simlayon

    I can only find one domainer who does not have his fingers in the pie that actually believes in these new domains. I think that says a lot.

    Reply
  5. Jeff Schneider

    One of the biggest Online events in history has almost gone unoticed.

    Alibaba.com last week in ONE DAY, processed 5.75 Billion in online payments. This is 2 1/2 times our Cyber monday totals. Most if not all this haul was processed through Alibaba.coms network of .COM affiliate sites.

    Nary a mention was made of this by most of the domaining blogosphere, whose Blustery promotions have focused on the gTLD rollout. They much rather prefer focusing domainers attention on trivial events in comparison, like NamesCon.

    Gratefully, Jeff Schneider (Contact Group) (Metal Tiger)

    Reply
  6. UFO

    The real acid test that domainers have to ask themselves ‘are there any domains on a particular gTLD they would buy for rego?’. If there is, then the argument is one of pricing not of relevance.

    The second test isn’t really whether they appear on dnjournal, but actually start making inroads on the SE results. That is the biggest leading indicator. With some what 25%? of traffic pushed through Google then you know they will start influencing people’s habits even without any advertising.

    I think gTLDs like .shop and .web will be the initial Trojans, and they’ll start softening everything up on the commercial side, with .brands later; we’ll have .blog and others softening up the social media side.

    It will be a slow haul, but it will go exponential at some point, just a matter of watching those leading indicators esp any .brand and .social adoptions.

    If you’ve bought into the .tv argument as to relevance then you’ve bought into the whole gTLD argument, its just a matter of assessing what is and what isn’t relevant.

    Reply
  7. Jeff Schneider

    The .COM Franchises International usage and appeal , trumps the hypothetical conjecture being cajoled by the gTLD Names Con.

    R. E. = ” They are coming to assumptions that are not backed up by examples of history. ”

    This pretty well sums up the hollow fabrications, being trumpeted in our Domestic Industry.
    While the sleeping giant International Markets seek .COM Franchises.

    Reply
  8. Uncle Sam

    gTLD registrants are trying to solve a problem that doesn’t exist. There is simply no demand for gtlds. Need a good name? Go ahead and buy a .com from the reseller, Rick Schwartz or the drop market. There are plenty available. If someone has the one you want, I have a suggestion – make arrangements to buy it from them. Gasp –capitalism!!! You have no entitlement to a good name just as you have none to an oceanfront home in California. Sure, getting one would be nice, but no one on this planet owes it to you. Americans have gotten to be fat and lazy with a sense of entitlement. I am here to tell you it just doesn’t exist.

    Reply
  9. JBS

    “For close to twenty years now, The Dark .COM Shadow Market has successfully deceived and manipulated .COM valuations.” Translation: For twenty years, certain unnamed dot com owners have been successful in controlling the value of their domains by deception and manipulation.

    “The .COM Franchises International usage and appeal , trumps the hypothetical conjecture being cajoled by the gTLD Names Con.” Translation: The international acceptance and use of dot coms trumps any marketing language by new gTLD registrars.

    These posts are getting embarrassing to read on such an influential blog – I don’t know what’s worse, the conspiracy theories or the writing style…

    Reply
  10. Altaf

    @Jeff:
    Thanks for the great news. Kindly, do you have the reference & break downs of the figure you mentioned? Gratefully,
    Altaf

    Reply
  11. Eric Borgos

    I am not sure your Las Vegas “rising tide” analogy is a good one. While It does seem applicable to the existing batch of non-.com extensions (.biz, .tv., .mobi, etc.) because those extensions give buyers some limited alternatives like a cruise ship or Atlantic City are alternate options for gamblers, the hundreds of soon to be launched “.whatever” domains may make this a whole new ballgame.

    We have no way of knowing how well Las Vegas would have done over the years without any competition. Maybe all those other gambling locations actually dragged Vegas down instead of lifting it up, but Vegas was rising so fast the competition did not matter? Anyhow, assuming you accept the fact the places like Indian casinos expand the gambling market and end up getting more people to go to Vegas because it is “special”, what would happen if they legalize gambling in every state (or online, which might have the same effect)? I think that is a better analogy to the .whatever situation, since the consumer is going to be presented with so many new options. The gambling market as a whole might expand, but Vegas could be left out of the rush. Similarly, .whatever domains will probably raise the overall market, but that fact alone does not mean it will help .com values. What really matters is that Vegas and .com domains both occupy a special place as being the creme of the crop. But, consumers are fickle and that could change over time with increased competition.

    Reply
  12. UFO

    I find it interesting how domainers think the general public are not interested / stupid etc and therefore everything being rational .com will always rule the roost.

    Well, stupid is as stupid does. Take your average builder; I know a few to put it mildly. Lots of small business builders would go for a URL that most domainers wouldn’t think is the best, but they don’t care because people come direct to them as they want them to do the work. Even my own father uses an email address firstname2build@domain.com, I’m sure given half the chance he would have gone for firstname2.build and his email address then would have been firstname@firstname2.build

    So what I’m getting across is that LOADS AND LOADS of small businesses and people will go for some memorable domain and the gTLD that best describes the industry they are in will be PREFERABLE than .com

    Is all this going to affect decent commercial .com’s? No. Is it going to affect $1000.com’s? Definitely. There is choice and small businesses are misers and don’t even know what SEO is but they do know what a $1000 is. Large portfolio of cheap .com’s will then start dumping and flipping them for ever cheaper prices.

    Yes, there is an absolute blizzard of cr*p coming down the road with some of these gTLDs. There will be so many of them that they will be selling them for $3 a year at retail, and Joe average will think that’s pin money. They’ll get one, then get email and then slowly but surely embedded as it starts getting increasingly identified and branded with their name.

    Reply
  13. John

    Rick,
    You bring up a solid point. But I just want to point out what you have said many times that makes a .com valuable is the brandability AND the type in traffic. If you type in any google search term it is very common to see word.whatever

    Granted it is not the norm, but a search engine will have to take domain.whatever as a branded search, and so will the browsers.

    Am I saying that the .com will loose value? No, but I am saying that the .whatever will turn out to be very lucrative in that aspect.

    Reply
  14. brand

    I agree with rick, its not a word, its like saying sheet musics.
    But i was surprised when i appraised it.
    The thing is we are putting the cart before the horse on this musics.com, lets see if go daddy can collect the money. These auction houses still work on the honor system, doing business on a hand shake and you can’t take a persons word that they are going to pay anymore, those days are over.
    If a deposit was required like in the real world of buying and selling property, go daddy would stand a better chance of getting paid.
    I bet we see musics.com back up for auction again very soon…lol
    By the way if your thinking on sheetmusics.com its already taken and not by me.haha.

    Reply
  15. Mike

    People hear what they want to hear. I am not even a mid level domainer, just a beginner but I think anyone can see gTLDS have quite a bit of work to do. Half of my week I spend as a high school athletic director, and the other half is spent as a writer/early domain name investor. I work with teens, coach them and they are part of my athletic department teams. They are extremely difficult to get a hold of their attention. I don’t think anyone ever covered this aspect but quite a few of the ones I deal with have ADD and take medicine in order to concentrate. The have attention spans the size of an ant. How are new gTLDs going to get and hold their attention. They are always preoccupied and extremely forgetful. Its going to be extremely difficult if success is to be achieved here with regards to them embracing something other .coms and just like I have to constantly remind them about our sports games, they will have to be reminded each and every day about gTLDS.

    I coach high school sports and deal with the same generation that Frank says will embrace gTLDS. I send out a text the night before saying game tomorrow at 3:30pm, and people honestly write back “cool coach, what time is the game.” This is the same generation that Frank says will embrace the new gTLDS. Going to be very hard to reach them and compete for their attention, and redirecting them to extensions like .tattoo. I just don’t see it happening. Too hard and one would have to spend the rest of their lives reminding people what the extension is. There are simply too many distractions for them.

    gTLDS will be used by young entrepreneurs who want to start a company and don’t want to pay the blood money for the .com. It’s not a matter of being willing to use .whatever, its entirely a matter of getting people to remember, and to type in used.cars and not usedcars.com. Usedcars.com would be the winner if a used.cars all of a sudden starts a marketing campaign. All their hard earned dollars will go to usedcars.com because quite a few people don’t listen and only hear bits and pieces of info. They will naturally revert back to .com.

    Rick is totally correct in saying .com will be the winner. Still don’t believe him. At the SuperBowl this year do this. When you are watching the commericals start talking about brands and company branding and marketing. You will put most people to sleep who simply want to drink their beer and ear their nachos. I’ve done it. I love marketing and branding, but thats because I studied it in college. Most don’t want to hear it, and if they do hear something like used.cars run and ad, it will go in one ear out the other because all they know is .com.

    They don’t want to hear it, so how can a company logistically think they can base a
    company around .whatever when people simply aren’t capable or don’t want hear it. The hilarious part is the business owners from the traffic convention barely even knowing their own web addresses, followed by being hesitant if its .com or not. Now companies think they can redirect those same people who barely remember .com and company addresses to .whatever addresses. Just seems like an uphill battle from the start and will be beyond confusing.

    People barely even realize .coms now. I’m in my early thirties and think it will be at least another ten years before people realize gTLDS are here, and ten more years before they are embraced and used. That’s quite a bit of time, but I’m speaking from someone who works with kids that if the new gTLDS are going to think they can get a hold of the Miley Cyrus “it’s my mouth I can say what I want to” generation they have quite a lot of work to be done. The kids today are forgetful and downright preoccupied with facebook, twitter, snapchat, instagram, etc. They know what a domain name is, but most certainly don’t know of gTLDs. In fact judging from the Youtube traffic video numbers, it seems only a thousand or so people know what gTLDS are. They have 7 more billion people that need to be explained to. Staggeringly difficult task.

    Rick I was hoping you could weigh in on what I said, because most people do not listen to what they are told, and the new generation coming up is extremely difficult if not impossible to get through to. Just thought I’d weigh in.

    Reply
    1. Rick Schwartz

      Mike,
      When they saw the video that Howard did they laughed because they did not believe it was representative of what it is like out there.

      Your post should make them cry. You nailed it. Attention span is zero. Kids are getting dumbed down by a society that is no longer shooting for excellence and you are on the front lines seeing it.

      Human Nature and the distractions and lowered standards have them hostage and sometimes parents that are equally distracted etc.

      Reply
  16. UFO

    Some of these gTLDs will make great long tail SE sites if the reg fees are low enough.

    Given that SEs deliver some 25% of traffic then gTLDs at 1% of com values could make great conduits of traffic.

    Reply
  17. Smile Fu

    Rick, Thanks for the gTLD reply. I think the real issue here is that the gTLD people have their business plan and on paper it makes sense, but I just believe they will find it hard to translate into the real world. It sounded to me via the traffic video that they will target the young generation, generation YOLO (you only live once.) If that truly is the market then I think they would be best suited going out to a highschool and seeing the kids firsthand, kids that walk around like zombies with headphones on not acknowledging their surrounding world around them, L

    Like I said I work part time as a high school athletic director, and you’d be shocked at what we can’t do. So many simple things aren’t because of this attention span problem. It may sound like im over hyping it, but the gTLDS will need to pay attention to this.

    Once again I point to a real life example to solve this riddle, not to the domain spere. The other day I placed a basketball outside my office door for the basketball team to use and instructed them to place it there when practice was over. When practice was over I found the ball there. I was beside myself. Usually they never listen. I have to send out three messages in one hour to remind them to do so. Now imagine you’re a company trying to market to this demographic. It’s almost impossible. Just putting it out there for everyone. -MIke

    Reply
  18. Altaf

    Rick,
    All these because all brains are preoccupied with many things, specially social net. I tried to teach a teen talent about domain. They rather engage with FB than what I said. I surveyed & found 99.99% of my community does not know domains than .com & no one realized what I said about your ‘no other property has ever appreciated value like domains’. How they will remember other new gTLDs? It will take another 100 years to make them understand domains, who barely remember .com. If any forum like T.R.A.F.F.I.C would do the same job as you, then it would take 25 years, Cause 7bn will be 14bn by then. IMO. Gratefully, Altaf

    Reply
  19. Domainlogist

    For me, the competition between .com and new gTLDs is like if you compare the paintings of Da Vinci, Van Gogh, Rembrandt, Michelangelo, Rafael an other known painters with the pictures made by the modern digital cameras and smartphones.

    Reply
  20. Pitbull

    I had time to think about this and someone brought up a good point. People look for simplicity. The problem with all of this is that it will be complexity. Think for a moment, Facebook is popular because it brings people together. One website can do that. How will a customer understand facebook.home, facebook.nebraska, facebook.local. None of that brings anyone together, none of that connects us all. The great part, perhaps best part of the internet is the non-segregation.

    I do believe all these new tld’s will somehow fit into the cyber eco-cycle… It is just succinct to point out, no only is .com synonymous with the internet, it really is the internet, that one .com that connects us all…

    Reply
  21. Rick Schwartz

    sweet.candy
    http://www.sweet.candy

    And word of mouth and mistakes and wrong links will look like this:

    sweetcandy.com
    http://www.sweetcandy.com
    http://www.sweet.candy.com
    http://www.sweetcandy.com
    sweetcandy
    http://www.sweetcandy.com
    http://www.sweet.candy.com

    So traffic will always splinter because there is built in confusion.

    The guy who owns sweetcandy.com wins on any success the other may enjoy and since they would be direct competitors assuming their were busiensses on both. Even when there is understanding, there will still be confusion.

    Which url did I use twice above?
    Let me know when your head is ready to blow apart.

    Reply
  22. Oeystein

    Nice blog.

    From my country, Norway, all that matters is .no, because .com has to much spam sites and spam mails. So go check your target. I also think .web is better than .net

    Reply
  23. Jeff Schneider

    People are getting fed up with GOOGLE.coms spying techniques and collusionary tactics used to corner the Ad Markets. Googles support of the D.N.A. points to a furthering strategy to maintain googles monopoly hold.The players pushing the .Whatsthis?, rollout are uniting, and Google is leading the charge.

    From a trained Market Analysts perspective, it becomes very clear that Google.com will profit greatly from the .Whatsthis rollout. Why ??Because ALL search engines profit goals depend on confused consumers looking for things to buy. Therefore any strategy that destroys Branding recognition as a solution to meet their needs, plays into their deceptive strategies.
    Destoying ALL Branding Recognition creates a fertile ground for SEO misinformation and propoganda. This confusion, which they facilitate quite happily,misleads consumers and at the same time pads their Bank Accounts at the Consumers Expense. They make Billions by leaving consumers misguided and confused and totally dependent on where their search Search Engine selectively routes them.
    Google the largest promoter of the gTLD rollout stands to benefit most from this massive promotional operation.

    Gratefully, Jeff Schneider (Contact Group) (Metal Tiger)

    Reply
  24. UFO

    I’ll be buying some .whatevers after the initial round when the euphoria is over and they drop in value. Should be some good pickings then.

    Won’t go after many, but a few that can come good in the future for business development.

    Reply

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