The Days of .com Dominance Coming to an end shortly, says our Friend Juan Diego Calle

Evening Folks!

"The days of .com dominance will be coming to an end shortly, says Juan Diego Calle, founder of .CO" in a Inc article.

Hey Juan.....Bullshit! :-)

So this is the type of NOISE we will begin to hear. In articles like this one that sounds more like an advertorial than a fact based article.

We are going to be hit with this crap until these folks begin to die on the vine. I have the first 9 candidates right here that Michael Berkens wrote about this morning. As one commenter stated, .crap would be better than these:

.CAMERA

.CLOTHING

.EQUIPMENT

.GURU

.HOLDINGS

.LIGHTING

.SINGLES

.VENTURES

.VOYAGE

.Rick Schwartz

 

 



21 thoughts on “The Days of .com Dominance Coming to an end shortly, says our Friend Juan Diego Calle

  1. Paul Nicks

    It seems the definition of dominance is what’s important for this article and opinions like yours and Juan’s. I could easily state that Toyota’s market share dominates that of Lexus, while Lexus’ margins dominate Toyota. Of course both of these car companies are run by the same parent under different business models so saying one is superior to another is a matter of personal preference to outside observers, while the parent company is happy to reap the rewards of diversification.

    So, Juan is likely correct that new gTLDs, in aggregate, will eventually surpass the registration numbers of .com. In the same vein, you are likely correct that resale prices will remain higher, on average, for .COM. Both outcomes can be true at the same time, and both can be viewed as dominance.

    Reply
  2. jose jose

    even if you put PORN , SEX , or DOMAIN in front of those extensions they wouldn’t amount to DICK!!!!!!!!!!!

    Reply
  3. Konstantinos Zournas

    Saying that 1000 extensions will surpass in number of registrations a single extension in a few years and call this dominance is not even playing safe. It is plain stupid.
    And if new gTLDs “dominate” .com guess what will happen to .co!!!!

    Reply
  4. Jacek

    Mark, You’re one pretty smart domain dude .Co is going to be a headache of a lifetime to some .com dinosaurs

    Reply
  5. UFO

    All the hype is great, if it leads to a temp depression in any .com’s with holders selling them to buy these .whatevers (or soaking their cashflows) then great.

    Real businesses will always want the .coms. With the Toyota/Lexus argument the matter of the fact that any consumer would prefer something better than the Toyota or Lexus if they could afford it, that’s why Lexus esp has a high depreciation rate.

    It is more than possible that the level of non TLDs will exceed .com; I wouldn’t be surprised if cctlds don’t already exceed them. But all the pigeon shit will move onto them rather than 3/4 word .coms. Things that are very brandable and don’t have a massive reliance on the internet for their business model will move to new TLDs. Like small clubs to .club

    But commercial companies will use the best TLD for commerce and that will be .com.

    Also @Nick, if any clothing clothes you, why do you wear a suit on your avatar? Don’t want to look like a pauper in commerce? Same with having some pigeon shit TLD.

    Reply
  6. Observer

    Whatevers will gain nothing by trying to denigrate .com. Whatever born out of malice will only destroy itself.

    Reply
      1. Rick Schwartz

        And it is a silly strategy that as you point out can only backfire. .whatever is going to have to stand on its on merits with its own unique content.

        They are running around saying .com is your grandfathers extension. I think they are scared they
        might not be right.

        It will be our facts vs their emotion. Haven’t we seen this movie?

        I hope they have a success, but resorting to attacking .com is very very
        very weak.

        Reply
  7. Max Metal

    The best thing that can happen, and probably will, is if these nine new extensions crash and burn and lay a road of ash for the others to follow.

    If that happens, nobody will want any or most of the following ones that come out.

    Who wants to risk big development money on unproven, mysterious ground where there are already nine stinking TLD carcasses laying rotting in the sun?

    Reply
  8. domo sapiens

    and the verbal diarrhea continues…

    I guess no lesson learned from the Overstock ‘o.co’ expensive and costly FIASCO, they lost traffic = sales = revenue.

    All of the Fortune 500 companies and their marketing gurus using a Dot Com are wrong …

    the advertorial posted at a Dot Com : Inc.com

    Reply
  9. Observer

    Whatevers should be grateful to the coming TRAFFIC for providing the opportunity to attack .com and promote themselves.

    Reply
  10. UFO

    If I wanted to play black hat investor and I wanted to create a ****fest I’d do the following. Say I wanted to profit from now.com

    1) Buy ANY domain that was Now.* (Could be now.ml or whatever wherever)
    2) File a priority registration in my home nation UK for fly.now.ml for class 35 (With absolute intent to conduct trade from this subdomain)
    3) Then flip it into a USPTO mark within the 6 month priority period.
    4) Gain an international registration basis in the US without the need for in use
    5) Get some use within 5 years
    6) Wait for .NOW to be delegated
    7) Ask the .NOW registry for fly.now on the basis of trademark case law at registration cost. As it stands on a left to right and confusion basis you’d win every time.

    You could cherry pick a lot of good domains.

    But I’m white hat.

    The question is what has ICANN done on the legal side and what legislation has it got passed to stop all this…. ?? This sort of thing is enough to kick the whole process into touch for years as it’s a major financial risk if you’re spending millions to acquire a TLD.

    Reply
  11. Kris

    I can’t wait to hear some of the new tld registrants try to explain their email address to someone. This will be the most confusing part to adapt into culture outside of the website address itself. Change is a good thing but this may be a little overwhelming pushing people right back into their comfort zone! I hope I am wrong going into this unknown space but fortunately for me I do know one known variable in this equation that is 99.9% constant when it comes to change…human nature:)

    Reply
  12. UFO

    Actually as a defensive mechanism the owners of shop.com etc could file trademarks especially throwing in a few subdomains and I believe they could stop the TLD .shop dead in its tracks. There is plenty of evidence showing confusion O.co etc and all the other trademark law principles.

    Perhaps this is one of the reasons why ICANN is trying to avoid profiting from these issues because otherwise it could find itself as defendant in an action. But by allowing a bunch of potential registries to decide collusively who has what seems almost worse. It reeks of anti competitive type issues. The issuance of .com never had these issues, it was available for all at one flat cost, and in fact they were free.

    What’s wrong in intellectual property law is that .com etc WERE generic new and undefined and thus all trademarks and confusion was always on the left of the TLD and the TLD had no use in normal course of trade….. Now ICANN is almost deciding to play the game of cyber squatter by allowing migration towards the left of domain strings by releasing the undefined anchor on the right.

    What is going to happen like with .shop is the biggest fish is going to pay off smaller applicants in a classic ANTI COMPETITVE COLLUSIVE act because ICANN will not want to take financial gain… and in fact it would seem that it incentivises a collusion by refunding application fees if they decide amongst themselves.

    So perhaps black hat strategies by domainers is fair game because it seems that potential registries will be colluding for profit for themselves.

    Or perhaps I’m stir fry crazy…

    Reply
  13. Anita

    Well what else can their be their strategy I ask you?? They only way they can try to market their extension is to pooh pooh .COM’s supremacy from all angles.

    IMHO they are targeting the uninitiated and clueless and they will surely succeed for a while (like Rick and others have been saying) in terms of people coming in for the “new gold rush” – pity the people who waste a lot of money on these.

    The more I read about their unfair and untruthful ways of trying to make a name for their new extensions to very gullible customers the more I’m seeing a huge downfall to their nogood plans.

    Reply
  14. SGK

    When seeing the fact of internet, it seem that .com will be still the king for years. Just check up the fact hear : http://royal.pingdom.com/2013/01/16/internet-2012-in-numbers that says that in December 2012 there are 634 million number of websites (some are WordPress, Tumblr, blogger, etc) , only 264 million regisration of Gtld’s and 104.9 million regisyration of CCTlds (.That’s mean not yet all website use domains, the Ecommerce era is just in the begin). Some of .com domain are still parking or not being active website. Active-Domain.com said that just 97% of words in Webster’s dictionary are registered in .com. That means there are still chances to new register good worlds in .com. So I don;t see any urgently to move to new tlds especially for business owners. But when it comes the times for all website owners want to have website with their own domains, even all registered domains will be sold immediately (look at the data, there are numbers of active websites two times of domains registered now).

    Reply
  15. John Poole

    This is not rocket science. The brightest “internet” mind in the Valley in the last 10 years, excluding Steve Jobs and the Googlers, is Mark Zuckerberg. Did Facebook (or Zuckerberg) waste ANY money on the new gTLDs? (And Facebook and Zuck have PLENTY of $$$). There’s your answer. But you say what about Google? Yeah, watch Google dominate the market in the new gTLDs–Google will give the startups “a startup package” of dot whatever, Google “tools and services” including Google Cloud engine and website hosting, Google venture capital, and plenty of other “goodies” that even the great Frank Schilling can’t compete against. When the startup “makes it,” it will be bought by Google or some other giant, the dot whatever will be “thrown away” (see “Yahoo acquires Bre.ad”) and the startup folded into the “mothership dot com.” So there you have it—if you don’t have any money (or sense), you’ll end up with a dot whatever, but “if you want to run with the big dogs” you’ll get a dot com.

    Reply

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